Year 2019, Volume 6, Issue 2, Pages 196 - 204 2019-08-07

The Effect of Nutrient-Allelochemicals Interaction on Food Consumption and Growth Performance of Alder Leaf Beetle, Agelastica alni L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

Dilek Yıldız [1] , Nurver Altun [2] , Mahmut Bilgener [3]

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In this study, the effects of secondary metabolites on the feeding preference and growth of generalist caterpillars, Agelastica alni L., were investigated. Feeding experiment has been applied with a total of 11 diet; 6 of which were prepared by adding different concentrations of gallic acid (1, 3, 5 %) and quinine (0.125, 0.25, 0.5 %) to the control diet, 3 diet of which prepared by adding different concentrations of gallic acid and quinine. According to the results, the amount of gallic acid consumed did not affect the food consumption and the amount of pupa lipids. However, the amount of gallic acid consumed positively affects the pupal mass and the pupal crude protein. In addition, the amount of quinine consumed negatively affected the developmental performance of larvae except for the food consumption. As the count of secondary metabolites in the diet increases, the pupal mass and the pupal crude protein decrease. Overall, during the co-evolution processs, A. alni larvae may be able to adapt to gallotannins. However, quinine, an alkaloid, is a feeding deterrence and growth suppressor for larvae.

Secondary metabolite, Gallotannin, quinine, Co-evolution, Agelastica alni, Alnus glutinosa
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Primary Language en
Subjects Biology
Published Date June
Journal Section Articles
Authors

Orcid: 0000-0001-9219-9122
Author: Dilek Yıldız
Institution: RECEP TAYYİP ERDOĞAN ÜNİVERSİTESİ
Country: Turkey


Orcid: 0000-0002-2657-9263
Author: Nurver Altun (Primary Author)
Institution: RECEP TAYYİP ERDOĞAN ÜNİVERSİTESİ
Country: Turkey


Orcid: 0000-0001-7883-6973
Author: Mahmut Bilgener
Institution: ONDOKUZ MAYIS ÜNİVERSİTESİ
Country: Turkey


Bibtex @research article { ijsm499519, journal = {International Journal of Secondary Metabolite}, issn = {}, eissn = {2148-6905}, address = {İzzet KARA}, year = {2019}, volume = {6}, pages = {196 - 204}, doi = {10.21448/ijsm.499519}, title = {The Effect of Nutrient-Allelochemicals Interaction on Food Consumption and Growth Performance of Alder Leaf Beetle, Agelastica alni L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)}, key = {cite}, author = {Yıldız, Dilek and Altun, Nurver and Bilgener, Mahmut} }
APA Yıldız, D , Altun, N , Bilgener, M . (2019). The Effect of Nutrient-Allelochemicals Interaction on Food Consumption and Growth Performance of Alder Leaf Beetle, Agelastica alni L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). International Journal of Secondary Metabolite, 6 (2), 196-204. DOI: 10.21448/ijsm.499519
MLA Yıldız, D , Altun, N , Bilgener, M . "The Effect of Nutrient-Allelochemicals Interaction on Food Consumption and Growth Performance of Alder Leaf Beetle, Agelastica alni L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)". International Journal of Secondary Metabolite 6 (2019): 196-204 <http://ijsm.ijate.net/issue/44217/499519>
Chicago Yıldız, D , Altun, N , Bilgener, M . "The Effect of Nutrient-Allelochemicals Interaction on Food Consumption and Growth Performance of Alder Leaf Beetle, Agelastica alni L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)". International Journal of Secondary Metabolite 6 (2019): 196-204
RIS TY - JOUR T1 - The Effect of Nutrient-Allelochemicals Interaction on Food Consumption and Growth Performance of Alder Leaf Beetle, Agelastica alni L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) AU - Dilek Yıldız , Nurver Altun , Mahmut Bilgener Y1 - 2019 PY - 2019 N1 - doi: 10.21448/ijsm.499519 DO - 10.21448/ijsm.499519 T2 - International Journal of Secondary Metabolite JF - Journal JO - JOR SP - 196 EP - 204 VL - 6 IS - 2 SN - -2148-6905 M3 - doi: 10.21448/ijsm.499519 UR - https://doi.org/10.21448/ijsm.499519 Y2 - 2019 ER -
EndNote %0 International Journal of Secondary Metabolite The Effect of Nutrient-Allelochemicals Interaction on Food Consumption and Growth Performance of Alder Leaf Beetle, Agelastica alni L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) %A Dilek Yıldız , Nurver Altun , Mahmut Bilgener %T The Effect of Nutrient-Allelochemicals Interaction on Food Consumption and Growth Performance of Alder Leaf Beetle, Agelastica alni L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) %D 2019 %J International Journal of Secondary Metabolite %P -2148-6905 %V 6 %N 2 %R doi: 10.21448/ijsm.499519 %U 10.21448/ijsm.499519
ISNAD Yıldız, Dilek , Altun, Nurver , Bilgener, Mahmut . "The Effect of Nutrient-Allelochemicals Interaction on Food Consumption and Growth Performance of Alder Leaf Beetle, Agelastica alni L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)". International Journal of Secondary Metabolite 6 / 2 (August 2019): 196-204. https://doi.org/10.21448/ijsm.499519